Andrew Ducker (andrewducker) wrote,
Andrew Ducker
andrewducker

I am in awe

I had assumed that the thigs I'd heard about Greek corruption and incompetent financial practices were overblown. Reading an amazing article which highlights just how bad things were. It's clear that Greece wasn't being run as a normal country in the slightest.

In addition to its roughly $400 billion (and growing) of outstanding government debt, the Greek number crunchers had just figured out that their government owed another $800 billion or more in pensions. Add it all up and you got about $1.2 trillion, or more than a quarter-million dollars for every working Greek.


...

In just the past decade the wage bill of the Greek public sector has doubled, in real terms—and that number doesn’t take into account the bribes collected by public officials. The average government job pays almost three times the average private-sector job. The national railroad has annual revenues of 100 million euros against an annual wage bill of 400 million, plus 300 million euros in other expenses. The average state railroad employee earns 65,000 euros a year. Twenty years ago a successful businessman turned minister of finance named Stefanos Manos pointed out that it would be cheaper to put all Greece’s rail passengers into taxicabs: it’s still true. “We have a railroad company which is bankrupt beyond comprehension,” Manos put it to me. “And yet there isn’t a single private company in Greece with that kind of average pay.” The Greek public-school system is the site of breathtaking inefficiency: one of the lowest-ranked systems in Europe, it nonetheless employs four times as many teachers per pupil as the highest-ranked, Finland’s. Greeks who send their children to public schools simply assume that they will need to hire private tutors to make sure they actually learn something. There are three government-owned defense companies: together they have billions of euros in debts, and mounting losses. The retirement age for Greek jobs classified as “arduous” is as early as 55 for men and 50 for women.


...


"The second day on the job I had to call a meeting to look at the budget," he says. "I gathered everyone from the general accounting office, and we started this, like, discovery process." Each day they discovered some incredible omission. A pension debt of a billion dollars every year somehow remained off the government’s books, where everyone pretended it did not exist, even though the government paid it; the hole in the pension plan for the self-employed was not the 300 million they had assumed but 1.1 billion euros; and so on. "At the end of each day I would say, 'O.K., guys, is this all?' And they would say 'Yeah.' The next morning there would be this little hand rising in the back of the room: 'Actually, Minister, there’s this other 100-to-200-million-euro gap.' "


...

As he finishes his story the finance minister stresses that this isn’t a simple matter of the government lying about its expenditures. "This wasn’t all due to misreporting," he says. "In 2009, tax collection disintegrated, because it was an election year."

"What?"

He smiles.

"The first thing a government does in an election year is to pull the tax collectors off the streets."

"You’re kidding."

Now he’s laughing at me. I'm clearly naïve.


The rest is here
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