March 9th, 2014

Illuminati

Why dealing with dates and times is a sure route to madness

Having had to deal with nice simple problems like "What if a person is in timezone A, working with times from timezone B", I am very glad that I don't have to deal with anything more complex.

For a brief understanding why dates and times are so complex, watch this. It's theoretically about computers, but actually it's mostly about the fact that questions like "How much time passed between this date and that date" are not actually simple at all.



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Illuminati

This picture is unpossible

I have a spinning disk hard drive in my PC, and an SSD. The SSD acts as a cache for the hard drive.*

Theoretically it caches whatever I'm using the most, and as I'm probably not using more than 30Gig of data regularly, that seems like a reasonable time/money trade-off.

It's tricky for me to trust the software it runs with, though, when it shows me images like this:


Where it's somehow telling me that the cumulative amount read from the normal hard drive has _dropped_. Now, if it was telling me that that was the cumulative amount read in the last couple of hours then I could see why it would drop. But the cumulative amount since boot?

*Zero points will be awarded to the first person that tells me to upgrade my 1GB HD to an SSD. Unless they also offer me the £500-odd necessary to pay for it.



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