Andrew Ducker (andrewducker) wrote,
Andrew Ducker
andrewducker

My computer was slow, and it was Microsoft's fault

I decided to set up my development environment on my laptop, so I can play with stuff while I'm on holiday for the next two weeks.

And for some reason, unzipping Eclipse was being incredibly slow. Like, 300kbps slow. Which is about 100 times slower than it should be (SSD, i5 processor). So I checked what the resource monitor, to see if something was hogging the disk, or using all of the CPU.

And found that Windows Defender was pegged solid at 25% of CPU. Which, as I have four cores, meant that it was using all of one of them. This was annoying for two reasons: (1) 100% of a CPU and it still couldn't manage more than 300kB/s of scanning? (2) Only using one CPU? What is this, the 20th century?

As it happens, I have a Norton license with 3 devices available on it. And Norton underwent a major rewrite a couple of years ago which meant that it was actually pretty efficient (and easy to install/uninstall, which used to be hell). So I logged onto their site, grabbed a licensed copy, and installed it. Which took about three minutes in total, and worked seamlessly.

I then ran a quick scan (which removed 29 tracking cookies), restarted my laptop (to be on the safe side), and unzipped Eclipse again. Which got me about 30MB/s, while using almost no CPU at all.

I normally recommend Microsoft's own anti-virus to people, on the grounds that it comes with the OS, and seems to score reasonably well on effectiveness. I think I'll have to stop doing that (or at least offering caveats).



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