Previous Entry Share Next Entry
I shall keep whining about the awful way that ebooks are sold until they fix it*.
Soccer Archery
andrewducker
Someone had a link to a cheap offer on The Hunger Games ebooks, in which they were only 84 cents from Kobo. So I followed the link, which told me that I couldn't use that site, as I am not American. So I went to the UK Kobo-run site, which did not have the same offer. So I went to the Google books site, which did not have them at all. At which point I decided they did not want my money, or they would not tease me so.

Five minutes later I bumped into this piece on Scalzi's blog in which Elizabeth Bear told me that her new novel was made of AwesomeSauce, drizzled over rich fantasy meat, with a side of yummy non-European world-building. And so I reversed my searchamotron, and made pit stops at Google Books and the UK Kobo site, discovering that neither of them had the book. So I tried Amazon UK, thinking they might have it, and I could buy it on Julie's Kindle, hack it and transfer it to my book reader. Only to discover that it is not in the UK Kindle shop. Oddly, it _is_ in the US Kindle shop, but of course you can't buy from there with a UK Amazon account, and there are limits to how hard I am willing to work on giving the industrial-publishing complex my money.

And so I have bought no books today**.

(As a note, I know that There Are Reasons why these things happen. I have read about them numerous times on various author blogs. But I frankly do not care that the authors, publishers, etc. have tied themselves into a Gordian knot that makes it hard for people to give them money. They can either find themselves an Alexandrian solution or perish, their choice.)

*And by "fix it" I include "They all go bust/copyright ceases to exist/aliens destroy mankind", in increasing order of likelihood.
** I didn't just download either of them either. I just decided to find something else to read.




Original post on Dreamwidth - there are comment count unavailable comments there.

I was going to reply to akirlu's post above, but felt it could deteriorate into a flameware far too fast.

I know that Stross has different publishers for both American and UK editions, he could have tried for a single publisher for both markets but he has his reasons, both historical and financial.

All his work has apart from Toast has been published on both sides of the pond.

His take on it is here:
http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog-static/fiction/faq.html

Very tactful, I appreciate it :->

And yeah, Charlie is one of the people that's written about it (and done so very well), that I'm referring to in my note at the end.

My bad for not double-checking on Charlie but the point remains -- whether or not content is legally available in the UK is a function of whether any publisher has bought the rights to publish it in the UK. If no UK publisher has plunked down the legal tender for the rights in a particular work, then it won't be legally available there. This is neither something that's unique to e-books, nor something authors have any significant power over.

This is neither something that's unique to e-books, nor something authors have any significant power over.

Alas... *sigh*

You are viewing andrewducker