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Interesting Links for 2-6-2011
Illuminati
andrewducker

Original post on Dreamwidth - there are comments there.

All diets are doomed because the moment you stop starving yourself, your body bounces back and puts the weight back on quickly, even if you're on the recommended number of calories for maintenance. Also, people don't think about what they're eating as they're obsessively following a rule book.

Atkins is worse than most people's ordinary diet. Too much meat, too little fibre, almost no vitamins and no fuel.

The only worthwhile diet advice I've ever seen is "Eat food, not too much, mostly vegetables". Combine that with an active lifestyle - geocaching helps here - and that's about the only way someone is going to attain and maintain a healthy weight.

All diets are doomed because the moment you stop starving yourself, your body bounces back and puts the weight back on quickly

Now that's something I can totally agree with - providing by "diet" you mean "A change to eating habits that is transitory and unsustainable." Which is what a lot of people mean by "going on a diet" - because they definitely mean to change back after a while.

The _other_ meaning of "diet" is just "What you eat, on an ongoing basis". And that is definitely changeable, and has long-term, reliable, consequences. A change in diet to something that is healthier is definietly worth doing, but only if it's sustainable in the long term.

"Atkins is worse than most people's ordinary diet. Too much meat, too little fibre"
Atkins very much encourages fiber: http://www.atkins.com/science/sciencearticleslibrary/Category9/Fiber.aspx
"We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: You can’t get too much fiber"
"Full of fiber and phytonutrients, veggies are one of the best sources of carbohydrates."
to pick a couple of quotes.

I tried a few years ago to make a change to in my diet and took up a low GI diet.

I bought two books, one a low GI recipe book and other was a recipe book with a four week day by day diet plan to be used as a transition tool.

I found the change in diet worked well. It was easy to make the change a permanent part of my life. I liked the food. I felt much healthier, both physically and mentally. I lost weight and felt good about that.

I fell off the diet when I was seconded to one of the sites my (former) employer owned in England for a few months and was living in a hotel during the week and having lunches provided at site. I got out of the good food habits I’d gotten into. As my son gets a little older and catering for him becomes less complex I look forward to returning to a low GI diet.

What I think worked for me was the slow release of blood sugar so I didn’t feel hungry along with the fact that that I enjoyed the food and was also required to think a little about what and how much I was eating. The 4 week introductory regime was a real help in making the transition and making a change in diet a habit.

Yeah, I also find that low GI stuff is reasonably easy to stick to. Even in work I just stick to the main+both vegetables, and skip the chips/mash/rice and that works fairly well.

Fair enough, however, I tend to think of diets as more long term. I don't care so much about losing weight right now (well I do, and that's why I've started doing more exercise), but I want to generally change my habits so that I'm choosing healthy food (e.g. keeping high salt foods out of my diet, eating all-bran for breakfast). If low GI is an all round better option, then that's something to keep an eye out for -- I'm not going for a quick fix by starving myself.

As it is, we only eat vegetarian food at home, and since Jules is also lactose intolerant, there's very little dairy, but my hours of sitting at a desk are not helping my stomach much.

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